The Almanach de Gotha Ltd and their website www.gotha1763.com are not the original Almanach de Gotha

The Almanach de Gotha Ltd and their website www.gotha1763.com are not the original Almanach de Gotha

notoriginalalmanachdegothaltd

The Almanach de Gotha Ltd and their website www.gotha1763.com are not the original Almanach de Gotha

The present status of the Almanach de Gotha explained: The publisher Almanach de Gotha Ltd, who publish a book called ‘Almanach de Gotha’ in London since 1998, which have two websites : www.gotha1763.com and www.almanachdegotha.com are not the original ‘Almanach de Gotha’ of the same name and should not and can not be considered as such the above organization and websites does not represent the original ‘Almanach de Gotha’, being first published by J.C. Dieterich in 1763 and last being published by Justus Perthes in 1944.

This is a quick yet very important note to anybody interested in European Royalty and Nobility. The Almanach de Gotha was an invaluable source of information for anyone interested in European aristocracy. However, many people seem to be confused upon its present status, and those websites listing the Gotha name and or reputing to be the ‘Original  Almanach de Gotha’, which does not exist anymore, being last published in 1944 by Justus Perthes, therefore any person or organization which claims that the original Almanach de Gotha still exists is factually incorrect and is furthermore misleading to the facts.

The ‘ALMANACH DE SAXE GOTHA’ a note to readers concerning the question and status of the Almanach de Saxe Gotha, which has had various online attacks, calling it Fake and not Real by certain unnamed online Trolls. In answer to the question and status of the Almanach Saxe Gotha Organization, it is Real and NOT fake, it contains correct genealogical  information and history for those interested in online Royal and Nobility genealogical reference with its websites: www.almanachdegotha.org  – www.almanachdegotha.netwww.almanachdesaxegotha.com  www.almanachdesaxegotha.org, the Almanach de Saxe Gotha does not claim to be the original Almanach de Gotha and does not claim that status, all the information listed upon their website is a mixture of written work by the editor of the site in question and information used from the internet, all of which is in the public domain and is free to use, it should be noted that Royal and Noble reference information and history should not and can not be owned by any particular individual and should be made available for everybody to use, read and study, that is why the Almanach de Saxe Gotha, has chosen to give free access to one of the largest database of Royal and Noble Genealogical Reference on the internet, with further access to thousands of pictures along side the reference information listed, as a further note the Almanach de Saxe Gotha, unlike others mentioned is not a business and makes no financial gain from its works. To view the History of the Old Almanach de Gotha, Original Royal Genealogical Reference Handbook – Genuine Editions – 1763-1944, please see their webpage for reference: http://www.almanachdegotha.org/id266.html

Whereas in factual reference to the present London based Almanach de Gotha Ltd, not to be confused with the original of the same name with their websites: www.almanachdegotha.com still under eternal construction it seems, and http://www.gotha1763.com which lists certain history of the original Almanach de Gotha and showing information on how to purchase their publication online for £60.00.

Their connection is the following: In 1989 the family of Justus Perthes re-established its right to the use the name Almanach de Gotha, the family then sold the right to use the name of Almanach de Gotha to a new company called Almanach de Gotha Limited in 1995 which was formed in London. Whereas Justus Perthes stated that they considered this to be only a new work and not a continuation of the original series of the Almanach de Gotha, last published by the family in 1944 with the 181st and last genuine edition. The new publishers launched with their 1st edition on 16th of March 1998 at Claridge’s Hotel in London, it was written in English instead of French as the Editor felt that English was now the language of diplomacy. A review in the Economist magazine criticized the London based edition for its low editorial standards and attacked Volume II for a purported lack of genealogical accuracy, the full article can be viewed for reference on the following link: http://www.economist.com/node/949183

It should be noted that the London based Almanach de Gotha Limited has no connection to Justus Perthes, other than the purchase of rights to use the Almanach de Gotha name under license and as such their publication can not and should not be considered either a continuation of the Old Gotha or in fact a Original copy of the legendary Almanach de Gotha of the same name, this fact is reinforced by Justus Perthes the original owners and publishers of the Almanach de Gotha, as stated above.

The final conclusion and fact is that at present, there is no publication, publisher, official representative or website that can be or should be considered to be the original Almanach de Gotha, which can be presently found upon the Internet, or Facebook or on Twitter.

© Copyright – 2013-2016

The Original Almanach de Gotha and the Real Almanach de ‘Saxe’ Gotha

The Original Almanach de Gotha and the Real Almanach de Saxe Gotha

almanachdesaxegotha

*All Genuine websites, but are not the Original Almanach de Gotha*

The above websites are all genuine but are not the original ‘Almanach de Gotha’, being first published by J.C. Dieterich in 1763 and last being published by Justus Perthes in 1944.

This is a quick yet very important note to anybody interested in European Royalty and Nobility. The Almanach de Gotha was an invaluable source of information for anyone interested in European aristocracy. However, many people seem to be confused upon its present status, and those websites listing the Gotha name and or reputing to be the ‘Original  Almanach de Gotha’, which does not exist anymore, being last published in 1944 by Justus Perthes, therefore any person or organization which claims that the original Almanach de Gotha still exists is factually incorrect.

Firstly, the Almanach de Saxe Gotha, is ‘Real’ and correct for those interested in online Royal and Nobility genealogical reference with its websites: www.almanachdegotha.org  – www.almanachdegotha.netwww.almanachdesaxegotha.com  www.almanachdesaxegotha.org, the Almanach de Saxe Gotha does not claim to be the original Almanach de Gotha and does not claim that status, all the information listed upon their website is a mixture of written work by the editor of the site in question and information used from the internet, all of which is in the public domain and is free to use, it should be noted that Royal and Noble reference information and history should not and can not be owned by any particular individual and should be made available for everybody to use, read and study, that is why the Almanach de Saxe Gotha, has chosen to give free access to one of the largest database of Royal and Noble Genealogical Reference on the internet, with further access to thousands of pictures along side the reference information listed, as a further note the Almanach de Saxe Gotha, unlike others mentioned is not a business and makes no financial gain from its works. To view the History of the Old Almanach de Gotha, Original Royal Genealogical Reference Handbook – Genuine Editions – 1763-1944, please see their webpage for reference: http://www.almanachdegotha.org/id266.html

Whereas in factual reference to the present London based Almanach de Gotha Ltd, not to be confused with the original of the same name with their websites: www.almanachdegotha.com still under eternal construction it seems, and http://www.gotha1763.com which lists certain history of the original Almanach de Gotha and showing information on how to purchase their publication online for £60.00.

Their connection is the following: In 1989 the family of Justus Perthes re-established its right to the use the name Almanach de Gotha, the family then sold the right to use the name of Almanach de Gotha to a new company called Almanach de Gotha Limited in 1995 which was formed in London. Whereas Justus Perthes stated that they considered this to be only a new work and not a continuation of the original series of the Almanach de Gotha, last published by the family in 1944 with the 181st and last genuine edition. The new publishers launched with their 1st edition on 16th of March 1998 at Claridge’s Hotel in London, it was written in English instead of French as the Editor felt that English was now the language of diplomacy. A review in the Economist magazine criticized the London based edition for its low editorial standards and attacked Volume II for a purported lack of genealogical accuracy, the full article can be viewed for reference on the following link: http://www.economist.com/node/949183

It should be noted that the London based Almanach de Gotha Limited has no connection to Justus Perthes, other than the purchase of rights to use the Almanach de Gotha name under license and as such their publication can not and should not be considered either a continuation of the Old Gotha or in fact a Original copy of the legendary Almanach de Gotha of the same name, this fact is reinforced by Justus Perthes the original owners and publishers of the Almanach de Gotha, as stated above.

The final conclusion and fact is that at present, there is no publication, publisher, official representative or website that can be or should be considered to be the original Almanach de Gotha, which can be presently found upon the Internet, or Facebook or on Twitter.

© Copyright – 2013-2016

Danmarks_Adels_Aarbog

Danmarks Adels Aarbog

Danmarks Adels Aarbog

Danmarks Adels Aarbog (Yearbook of the Danish Nobility) is an annual publication that details the genealogies, titles, and coats of arms of Danish and Norwegian noble families. It was first published in 1884, making it one of the oldest such publications. The most recent volume, covering 2003-2005, is one of more than ninety volumes in the series, which has detailed more than 700 pedigrees.

© Copyright – 2013-2016

burkespeerage

Burke’s Peerage

Burkes Peerage

Burke’s Peerage is foremost a genealogical publisher, which first published books by John Burke in London in 1826, recording the genealogy and heraldry of the peerage, baronetage, knightage and landed gentry of the United Kingdom, the historical families of Ireland as well as those of the Commonwealth of Nations, the Imperial, royal and mediatised families of Europe and Latin America, the presidential and distinguished families of the United States, the ruling families of Africa and the Middle East and other prominent families worldwide. Burke’s Peerage has expanded to provide broader genealogical publications (including online) becoming a premium brand.

History of Burke’s Peerage

Burke’s Peerage has provided authoritative genealogical records of historical families for more than 189 years. Its records were originally compiled by members of the Burke family and added to by others to build a unique collection of books of genealogical and heraldic interest.

Burke’s Peerage was established in 1826 by John Burke (1786–1848), who pioneered the narrative style which has become the trademark of Burke’s Peerage publications and a recognized model for written genealogies worldwide. He was also the progenitor of a dynasty of genealogists and heralds. His son Sir John Bernard Burke (1814–92) was Ulster King of Arms (1853–92) and his grandson, Sir Henry Farnham Burke (1859–1930), was Garter Principal King of Arms (1919–30). After his death, ownership passed through a variety of people, including Burke’s Peerage to Sir Henry Mallaby-Deeley, 1st Baronet (1863–1937) and Burke’s Landed Gentry to Arthur Maundy Gregory (1877–1941). The titles and copyright were all reunited by Shaw’s Reference Series, later incorporated in Mercury House Publications, which sold those in 1973 to the Holdway Group. The new board of directors included Jeremy Norman (chairman 1974–83), Patrick Anson, 5th Earl of Lichfield (1939–2005) and John Philip Brooke-Little (Norroy and Ulster King of Arms, 1927–2006). Entirely new volumes on royal families, country houses of the British Isles and Irish genealogy were published under the Burke’s Peerage name.

In 1984, Burke’s Peerage decided to separate and sell the copyright: Burke’s Peerage was acquired by Frederik Jan Gustav Floris, Baron van Pallandt (1934–94) whilst Burke’s Landed Gentry and other titles were sold elsewhere. Burke’s Peerage was then bought by Joseph Goldberg, who reprinted the immediate previous edition. In 1989, ownership was acquired by Brian Morris, who published the 106th edition in 1999, which comprised an updating and revision of the 105th edition (1970). The company, which owned the Burke’s name, Burke’s Landed Gentry and other titles, formed in 1984, had Lady Elizabeth Anson, Merlin Hay, 24th Earl of Erroll and Sir Iain Moncreiffe of that Ilk (1919–85) as directors. Burke’s Peerage Partnership was formed out of receivership in 1987 by those associated with the former company, including Harold Brooks-Baker (1933–2005) who was publishing director from 1984 until his death in 2005. In the 1990s, they briefly licensed the use of the Burke’s name to Halbert’s, an American publishing company which sold books under the name “The World Book of Surnames“, which otherwise had no connection with the Burke’s Peerage publishing house.

In 2000, the Wills family licensed the right to publish Burke’s Landed Gentry. After a gap of over 30 years, in 2001, a 19th edition of Burke’s Landed Gentry was published. In 2002 they bought the rights to Burke’s Peerage from Morris Genealogical Books, reuniting both titles under one publisher, Burke’s Peerage and Gentry (UK) Limited, for the first time in several years. They produced a fully updated Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage 107th edition which was published in 2003. In 2013 they sold the reunited Burke’s Peerage, with all its rights, assets, titles and copyright thereby assigned to a newly formed international company, Burke’s Peerage Limited, whose UK affiliate is Burke’s Peerage (1826) Limited (Company No. 08539019).

Burke’s Peerage editors include John Burke (1786–1848), Sir John Bernard Burke (1814–92), Ashworth Peter Burke (1864–1919), Sir Henry Farnham Burke (1859–1930) of Burke’s Peerage; Arthur Charles Fox-Davies (1871–1928) of Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland 1912 and Burke’s Landed Gentry 1914; A. Winton Thorpe of Burke’s Peerage and Burke’s Landed Gentry 1921; Alfred Trego Butler, Windsor Herald (1880–1946) of Burke’s Peerage 1923–34 and Burke’s Landed Gentry 1925; Miss E. M. Swinhoe of Burke’s Peerage 1927–37; Mr J. Smallshaw 1938–40 (although his name is not mentioned in those editions); Charles Harry Clinton Pirie-Gordon of Buthlaw (1883–1969) of Burke’s Landed Gentry 1930–36; John Seymour de Spon, Baron de Spon (1913–98) of Burke’s Peerage 1941–46; Leslie Gilbert Pine (1907–87) of Burke’s Peerage 1946–60; Kenneth Peter Townend (1921–2001) of Burke’s Peerage 1960–71; Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd (1946–2007) was Assistant Editor 1968–71, Editor 1971 and Editorial Director 1972–83; and Charles Gordon Mosley (1948–2013) of Burke’s Peerage 1989–2004.

Foundation

Burke’s Peerage Foundation was established on 5 January 2014, the 200th anniversary of the birth of Sir John Bernard Burke, to encourage people to take a greater interest in genealogy. Burke’s Peerage Foundation was registered as a UK charity (No.1155658) on 5 February 2014 with the object of advancing the education of the public about genealogy and personal heritage.

Appearances in popular culture

Burke’s Peerage continues to make frequent appearances in modern culture, with examples including popular television series as diverse as Downton Abbey, devised by Julian Fellowes, Lord Fellowes of West Stafford; also: Magnum PI, Agatha Christie’s Poirot and Ian Fleming’s James Bond.

Oscar Wilde famously penned in A Woman of No Importance: “You should study the Peerage, Gerald. It is the one book a young man about town should know thoroughly, and it is the best thing in fiction the English have ever done!” [said Lord Illingworth to his son Gerald Arbuthnot].

© Copyright – 2013-2016

debretts

Debrett’s Peerage & Baronetage

Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage

Debrett’s is a specialist publisher, founded in 1769 with the publication of the first edition of The New Peerage. The name “Debrett’s” honours John Debrett. Debrett’s is published under the name Debrett’s Peerage & Baronetage, a book which includes a short history of the family of each titleholder. The editor of Debrett’s Peerage and Baronetage is Charles Kidd.

Publications

Debrett’s has published a range of guides on traditional British etiquette, dating from the mid 1900s. Those now out of print include Debrett’s Correct Form in the Middle East, Debrett’s Guide to Entertaining, Debrett’s Guide to the Season, Debrett’s Etiquette and Modern Manners, The English Gentleman, Debrett’s Guide to Correspondence by Rolf Kurth, and a range of guides to families and counties in England and Scotland, histories of royal engagements and weddings, and cookery books.

In 2006, Debrett’s updated its Correct Form – the definitive guide to forms of address in the UK – to include a section on Business Etiquette, and another on American Usage. 2007 saw the publication of a new Debrett’s Wedding Guide, with advice on every aspect of the modern wedding, including traditional form for invitations, chapters on the roles and responsibilities of the bridal party, and a listing of who pays for what.

In recent years, books such as Debrett’s Etiquette for Girls, Debrett’s A – Z of Modern Manners and Debrett’s Guide for The Modern Gentleman have appeared.

In 2010 Debrett’s published Thoroughly Modern Motoring Manners and Petiquette, along with the 148th edition of Peerage & Baronetage and the 2011 edition of People of Today. A special edition of Guide for The Modern Gentleman was also produced for November, the men’s health charity, in support of its 2010 Modern Gentleman campaign theme. And the 2010 luxury diary range having sold out in 2009, the 2011 diary was published in a range of colours.

Debrett’s People of Today

Debrett’s People of Today, an annual publication (formerly known as Debrett’s Distinguished People of Today), is a rival to Who’s Who. It is published annually and is said, to catalogue the biographies of Britain’s most distinguished figures.

It contains biographical details of approximately 25,000 notable people from the entire spectrum of British society. The selection of entrants is made by the editorial staff of Debrett’s and entries are reviewed annually to ensure accuracy and relevance. Entries include details of career, education, family, recreations and membership of clubs as well as contact addresses. An additional feature is the correct style of address to be used when addressing correspondence to an entrant.

Like its rival publication Who’s Who selection of entrants is at the Editorial Team’s discretion and there is no payment or obligation to purchase. However, unlike Who’s Who, entrants are removed if they are no longer deemed to be suitable for inclusion

Debrett’s website

Debrett’s runs a website which contains 31,000 pages of advice and profiles, to view their website please see the following Link: www.debretts.com

Appearances in popular culture

In William Makepeace Thackeray’s classic novel Vanity Fair (1847), the elderly aristocrat Sir Pitt Crawley is described as “a selfish boor […] unworthy of his title” despite his name being in Debrett’s. Sherlock Holmes turns frequently to Debrett’s as a standard work of reference. Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence (1920) makes a glancing reference to one’s “standing in Debrett.” Debrett’s is mentioned in The Picture of Dorian Gray and Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime, both by Oscar Wilde, and is referred to satirically as a sacred book in the short story “Reginald at the Theatre” by Saki. In George Orwell’s Burmese Days, Mrs. Lackersteen is described as reading the Civil List, “the Debrett of Burma”. An out-of-date Debrett’s is a key plot element in an Elizabeth Mapp story (1920–1939) by E.F. Benson. Debrett’s Peerage is mentioned in P.G. Wodehouse novels, especially the Blandings stories, in which it is often referred to by Lord Emsworth. In Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited (1945), Charles Ryder mentions Sebastian’s family, to which Sebastian replies “There are lots of us. Look them up in Debrett”.

More recently, Debrett’s was mentioned in John le Carré’s spy novel The Tailor of Panama. Debrett’s New Guide to Etiquette and Modern Manners was a guest publication on Have I Got News for You in 1999. In the fashion sitcom Absolutely Fabulous, the character of Patsy Stone (Joanna Lumley) calls Debrett’s the “Who’s Who in what’s left of the British aristocracy”. Debrett’s Correct Form is mentioned by the cartoonist Giles. In the adult comic Viz, a strip called Billy Connolly has the titular character, who wishes to win the favour of the Queen, perusing a copy of Debrett’s. In the Sky TV Show So You Think You’re Royal, families who successfully proved heritage to the royal family were entered into Debrett’s. The original peerage guide is mentioned in Connie Willis’ novel To Say Nothing of the Dog, as a plot device to change one character’s attitude toward another when she discovers he is listed in it. In the third season of Downton Abbey, the Countess of Grantham dryly comments to her husband that “not everyone chooses their religion to satisfy Debrett’s”.

John Debrett

John Debrett (1753 – 15 November 1822) was the London-born son of Jean Louys de Bret, a French cook of Huguenot extraction. As a boy of thirteen, John Debrett was apprenticed to a Piccadilly bookseller and publisher, Robert Davis. He remained there until 1780, when he moved to John Almon, bookseller and stationer. John Almon edited and published his first edition of The New Peerage in 1769, and went on to produce at least three further editions. By 1790 he had passed the editorship on to John Debrett who, in 1802, put his name to the two small volumes that made up The Correct Peerage of England, Scotland and Ireland. Despite twice being declared bankrupt, Debrett continued as a bookseller, and retired in 1814. He was found dead at his lodgings on 15 November 1822, and was buried at St James’s, Piccadilly.

© Copyright – 2013-2016

Libro d’Oro – Golden Book of Italian Nobility

Libro d'Oro - Golden Book of Italian Nobility

goldenbookofitaliannobility

The Libro d’Oro (Italian: Golden Book), once the formal directory of nobles in the Republic of Venice (including the Ionian Islands), is now a privately published directory of the nobility of Italy. Following World War II, democratic Italy officially abolished titles and hereditary honours in its Constitution and ceased having an official governing body of nobility headed by the state. Titles bestowed after 28 October 1922 (i.e. after the rise to power of Fascism) were declared never to have existed. Only those families bearing older titles were permitted to use them. These laws did not apply to the nobility of Rome, insofar as they had been created by the Pope, when he was a sovereign head of state (i.e. until 20 September 1870). After a period of uncertainty, the Italian aristocracy continued to use their titles in the same way as they had in previous centuries.

This behavior was cemented by the continued publication of Il Libro d’Oro della Nobiltà Italiana, published as much to prevent self-styled aristocrats social climbing as to list the established nobility. The Libro d’Oro della Nobiltà Italiana (Golden Book of the Italian Nobility) is regularly published by the Collegio Araldico of Rome. It lists some of Italy’s noble families and their cadet branches. First published in 1910, it includes some 2,500 families, and may not be considered exhaustive. Included are those listed in the earlier register of the Libro d’Oro della Consulta Araldica del Regno d’Italia and the later Elenchi Ufficiali Nobiliari of 1921 and of 1933. The Libro d’Oro should not be confused with a social register – wealth, status and social contacts are of no consideration on the decision as to whether a person may be included in the book, the only consideration is the blood or marital relationship to the head of a noble family. Nor is it a peerage reference such as those published in Great Britain.

The currently published Libro d’Oro is not an official publication of the Italian state, which currently does not have a civic office to recognize titles of nobility or personal coats of arms. The most recent (24th) edition of Libro d’Oro della Nobiltà Italiana was published in September 2010.

In addition to the Libro d’oro of Venice, such books had existed in many of the Italian states and cities before the unification of Italy. For example, the Libro d’Oro of Murano, the glass-making island in the Venetian Lagoon, was instituted in 1602, and from 1605 the heads of the Council of Ten granted the title cittadino di Murano to those heads of families born on the island or resident there for at least twenty-five years.

A Libro d’Oro was also compiled on each of the Ionian Islands as a nobiliary of the members of local Community Councils (Zante 1542, Corfu 1572 and Cephalonia 1593) In the reformed Republic of Genoa of 1576 the Genoese Libro d’Oro, which had been closed in 1528, was reopened to admit new blood. By extension, a Libro d’Oro is a by-name for any nobiliary directory, as when Al. N. Oikonomides refers to “the recently published ‘libro d’oro’ of the wealthy ancient Athenians (J.K. Davies, Athenian Propertied Families 600-200 B.C. (Oxford 1971)”.

© Copyright – 2013-2016

http://www.collegio-araldico.it/librodoro.html

Gothic Horror – New London Almanach de Gotha – Volume II – Dated: Jan 24th 2002

Gothic Horror - New London Almanach de Gotha - Volume II - Dated: Jan 24th 2002

economist-logo


Gothic Horror – New London Almanach de Gotha – Volume II

Dated: Jan 24th 2002

FROM 1763 until the Russians stopped the presses when they swept into eastern Germany towards the end of the second world war, the Almanach de Gotha published elaborate lists and potted genealogies of Europe’s royal, semi-royal and leading ducal families. It was relaunched in 1998-a cause for music-hall jollity, if not historical excitement. Once again snobs and sneerers alike could work out where the Kotchoubeys de Beauharnais, the Barbianos di Belgiojoso d’Este and the Batthyany Strattmanns now live, whom they have married, what they do, and even-reading between the blood lines-whether they still, ahem, count.

The sine qua non of any reference book, however frivolous, is accuracy. Unfortunately, the latest installment of the Almanach, which purports to document those families that aren’t quite royal but are still pretty grand, is perhaps the most laughably sloppy product of its kind ever to have been published. It used, in the old days, to be in French. Now it is in English, albeit the English of someone apparently in desperate need of both a dictionary and a spell-check function on his PC. The book’s very first page, addressing the Hamiltons of Abercorn, Ulster’s only ducal family, contains no fewer than six howlers, starting on the third line, where a lymphad (a Viking ship common in west-coast Scottish coats of arms) becomes a “hymphad”.

Bloopers and typos abound: “moddel”, “marshall”, “sollicitor”, “baronett”, “the Scotts Guards”, “the Royal Human Society”. Translations are quirky: try “annulated” for annulled, or “secret camerist” for chamberlain. Place-names are particularly wayward: witness “Marocco”, “Varsaw”, “Turquey” and “Tchechoslovaquia”. The editor even manages to place the principality of Liechtenstein (misspelt, of course, without its first “e”) in Germany.

If the Almanach’s genealogical accuracy is of a similar standard, the matchmaking dowagers perusing its pages had better watch out. Their eyebrows might in any event twitch if they were to read on the Almanach’s website that its editor, John Kennedy, was “a former member of the [British] royal household” who is “separated from his partner, Princess Lavinia of Yugoslavia”. Eh? Mr Kennedy, formerly Jovan Gvozdenovic, is a sometime Conservative candidate for parliament who lobbied for Radovan Karadzic and once worked for Prince Michael of Kent. Presumably he dated the lovely Lav, herself born out of wedlock to a Karageorgevic. Gosh!

But if you go by the number of families still carrying royal-sounding prefixes, it is the Germans, of course, who provide Europe, and the Almanach, with its princely ballast, thanks mostly to the Holy Roman Empire. Some 16 German families, excluding the Habsburgs and the Liechtensteins, are deemed top-flight royalty by virtue of being more or less sovereign at some relatively recent historical moment, and are therefore included in the first volume. Among them is the family of Reuss, all of whose males are, confusingly enough, called Heinrich, 35 of whom were born in the last century.

The second part of volume one catalogues “mediatised princely families”: those which at some early point became subordinate to a greater royal house. There are 47 such families, whose members all call themselves princes and princesses. They have, it seems, survived quite well. They still overwhelmingly marry within caste; many still live in the ancestral schloss; they still have some cash; but few play much part in public life or politics.

It is in the second and newest volume that one enters a realm of fully-fledged absurdity. The choice of families is largely arbitrary. Only seven of Britain’s 24 non-royal dukedoms are chronicled, and those very patchily; most of the others are merely mentioned in the contents pages, while three of the grandest, Norfolk, Beaufort and Northumberland, are ignored altogether. Of Europe’s 274 non-royal but princely or ducal families considered worthy of entry, about a hundred listed in the contents pages are then bizarrely revealed to be extinct or documented only in previous, pre-1944 editions. It is an almanac with a most random kind of calendar.

How grand is a prince? In terms of commonness, Italian princeliness is the most devalued. Some 84 Italian families pop into the book, about a sixth of them Sicilian. (This represents a considerable drop from earlier, more vainglorious times: in 1800 Sicily alone boasted more than 100 princely and ducal families.) The French come next, with about 40 families chosen, a quarter of which flaunt dukedoms of mostly martial Bonapartist creation (Berthier, Davout, Junot, MacMahon, Murat and Ney among them); roughly half of the rest are post-Revolutionary creations. The Germans are still doing well, with another 29 third-division princely families listed, to add to the 63 in the first volume. A good many Russian and Polish families are given princely documentation, though once again with some glaring omissions.

To put it kindly, there are princes and princes. At a guess, there are probably more than 2,000 German ones-three times the number of hereditary British peers. Britain’s royal house has fewer than a score of living princes and princesses. To the unwary Almanach-reader, they would appear to be outshone by the family of Beguin Billecocq Durazzo, who have a full score of members bearing a seemingly royal prefix. No matter that their title was acquired in 1929 from Albania’s King Zog when grandpa was an insignificant French ambassador.

Source: http://www.economist.com/node/949183

 Source: http://www.almanachdegotha.org/id266.html

© Copyright – 2013-2016